Reverend randomblink

  1. Originally by cosmopolitanmagazine

    thekeevster:

    Reblogging fo’ myself

    (Source: cosmopolitanmagazine, via avon)

  2. Photo Originally by ushistoryminuswhiteguys ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Hit the Source: Research, bibliographies, and databases. 
Sources are an interesting thing. If someone throws enough of them at you, you’re inclined to believe that what they’re saying is true, that all the sources are relevant, and that they’re all unbiased and accurate sources. 
This is not always true. Just like the news outlets, some of them have specific biases, or present information in misleading ways. But sources can be incredibly important, and immensely helpful for writing papers. 
Here’s why, as explained by Grinnell:

Citation is important because it is the basis of academics, that is, the pursuit of knowledge. In the academic endeavor, individuals look at evidence and reason about that evidence in their own individual ways. That is, taking what is already known, established, or thought, they use their reasoning power to create new knowledge. In creating this knowledge, they must cite their sources accurately for three main reasons:
Reason One: Because ideas are the currency of academia
Reason Two: Because failing to cite violates the rights of the person who originated the idea. (Implicit or Explicit claims the idea is yours is plagiarism). 
Reason Three: Because academics need to be able to trace the genealogy of ideas 

Read and save the PDF here. I have removed the explanations that follow the reasons for a quick read, but I recommend you go back and read them. It also answers the question: “Doesn’t the ownership of ideas reek of Capitalism?”, and gives a great run-down of citing yourself, citing other people, extended quotations, and laziness in writing.  
In summary: Ideas are valuable, they have ‘ownership’ and ‘credit’ to the people who had them, and tracing how and why ideas change can help you learn. Pretending ideas are of your own invention is plagiarism. 
So what about doing research? People paste long bibliographies and that doesn’t seem to do anything. Why are those needed? 
Bibliographies and Annotated Bibliographies are a list of sources regarding a particular subject or topic - or directly relevant to a particular paper. They may look something like this:

— Screencap of Bibliography: Free People of Color and Creoles of Color
Sometimes, bibliographies are annotated, meaning they give a short description of each entry - perhaps a paragraph of information explaining each source, its usefulness, a summary, or other pertinent information. Annotated bibliographies can cut down on the time you spend trying to determine if a source is relevant for you. 
Purdue OWL gives samples of Annotated Bibliographies here. Here’s a student project from U Michigan that shows an annotated bibliography regarding Chicanos and identity. Here's a much more elaborate annotated bibliography regarding Native American history in Federal Documents. You can see there's a big difference between an extensive annotated bibliography, and a concise one. Both formats, however, can tell you what the bibliography's author thinks of the sources. 
This means that the author of the bibliography may be biased or disregard things that aren’t useful to them, but may be helpful to you! 
The accepted citation format for history and art history is Chicago style, a quick guide can be found here.
Citations tell you: Who wrote or edited something, where it was published, who published it, when it was published, and the title. It can even tell you the volume, edition, and translator. 
When you find a book or journal related to something you’re trying to learn more about, you can look at footnotes, or the bibliography in order to find where they got their information. 
Say I’m looking up slave culture in New Orleans:

Donaldson, Gary A. A Window on Slave Culture: Dances at Congo Square in New Orleans, 1800-1862.” Journal of Negro History 69, no. 2 (Spring 1984): 63-72.

I find this article online, and access it through a database. (I used JStor, in this case.) It was published in 1984, so I already know that anything this paper cites came out in 1984 or before 1984. 
The footnotes (or end notes, in this case, because they came at the end of the paper) tell me where the author got their information:

This author even annotated their endnotes, telling us more information about the sources they used. If any of those end notes seem relevant to me, I can write them down, and look for them later. 
But since this was published in 1984, it might also be helpful to see who has mentioned this paper since 1984 for more current information. 
JStor and Google Scholar (as well as other databases) have helpful buttons like these:


"2 items citing this item"
Other items (written works by the author)
References
and Related Items.

Clicking on “2 items citing this item” gives me a list of things published after the article came out in 1984 that cite this. It actually gives me 3 things when I click on the button:


Pinkster: An Atlantic Creole Festival in a Dutch-American Context
Jeroen Dewulf The Journal of American Folklore Vol. 126, No. 501 (Summer 2013) pp. 245-271 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jamerfolk.126.501.0245



"Midnight Scenes and Orgies": Public Narratives of Voodoo in New Orleans and Nineteenth-Century Discourses of White Supremacy Michelle Y. Gordon American Quarterly Vol. 64, No. 4 (December 2012) pp. 767-786 

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41809523



Enclosure and Run: The Fugitive Recyclopedia of Harryette Mullen’s Writing Robin Tremblay-McGaw MELUS Vol. 35, No. 2, Multi-Ethnic Poetics (SUMMER 2010) pp. 71-94 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20720704



They were published in 2010, 2012, and 2013, and while they may not all be helpful, this is how you get a good start looking for things that can help you in your research. It’s a bit like a treasure hunt. You have to follow the directions and clues to find the information you need or want. "Scholarly peer review" is a phrase that means that the information you see has been reviewed, critiqued, or tested by other scholars to see if the information holds up. You can also search for reviews of journal articles. 

Check your sources are related to what you want to talk about or are claiming, see if they are legitimate. 


Writing a Thesis Statement - UNC 
Scholarly vs. Non-Scholarly 1 | 2 | 3
Finding Academic Articles
The CRAAP test
Distinguishing among Scholarly, Popular, and Trade Journals
Locating a Scholarly or Professional Journal 
Evaluating Sources
Why Everything Isn’t Available Online and Free
How to Read Citations (video)
Berkeley Primary History Sources
Yale’s Art History & Archaeology source list & Guide
Previous USH-WG Guide

    ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

    Hit the Source: Research, bibliographies, and databases. 

    Sources are an interesting thing. If someone throws enough of them at you, you’re inclined to believe that what they’re saying is true, that all the sources are relevant, and that they’re all unbiased and accurate sources. 

    This is not always true. Just like the news outlets, some of them have specific biases, or present information in misleading ways. But sources can be incredibly important, and immensely helpful for writing papers. 

    Here’s why, as explained by Grinnell:

    Citation is important because it is the basis of academics, that is, the pursuit of knowledge. In the academic endeavor, individuals look at evidence and reason about that evidence in their own individual ways. That is, taking what is already known, established, or thought, they use their reasoning power to create new knowledge. In creating this knowledge, they must cite their sources accurately for three main reasons:

    Reason One: Because ideas are the currency of academia

    Reason Two: Because failing to cite violates the rights of the person who originated the idea. (Implicit or Explicit claims the idea is yours is plagiarism). 

    Reason Three: Because academics need to be able to trace the genealogy of ideas 

    Read and save the PDF here. I have removed the explanations that follow the reasons for a quick read, but I recommend you go back and read them. It also answers the question: “Doesn’t the ownership of ideas reek of Capitalism?”, and gives a great run-down of citing yourself, citing other people, extended quotations, and laziness in writing.  

    In summary: Ideas are valuable, they have ‘ownership’ and ‘credit’ to the people who had them, and tracing how and why ideas change can help you learn. Pretending ideas are of your own invention is plagiarism. 

    So what about doing research? People paste long bibliographies and that doesn’t seem to do anything. Why are those needed? 

    Bibliographies and Annotated Bibliographies are a list of sources regarding a particular subject or topic - or directly relevant to a particular paper. They may look something like this:

    image

    — Screencap of Bibliography: Free People of Color and Creoles of Color

    Sometimes, bibliographies are annotated, meaning they give a short description of each entry - perhaps a paragraph of information explaining each source, its usefulness, a summary, or other pertinent information. Annotated bibliographies can cut down on the time you spend trying to determine if a source is relevant for you. 

    Purdue OWL gives samples of Annotated Bibliographies here. Here’s a student project from U Michigan that shows an annotated bibliography regarding Chicanos and identity. Here's a much more elaborate annotated bibliography regarding Native American history in Federal Documents. You can see there's a big difference between an extensive annotated bibliography, and a concise one. Both formats, however, can tell you what the bibliography's author thinks of the sources. 

    This means that the author of the bibliography may be biased or disregard things that aren’t useful to them, but may be helpful to you! 

    The accepted citation format for history and art history is Chicago style, a quick guide can be found here.

    Citations tell you: Who wrote or edited something, where it was published, who published it, when it was published, and the title. It can even tell you the volume, edition, and translator. 

    When you find a book or journal related to something you’re trying to learn more about, you can look at footnotes, or the bibliography in order to find where they got their information. 

    Say I’m looking up slave culture in New Orleans:

    Donaldson, Gary A. A Window on Slave Culture: Dances at Congo Square in New Orleans, 1800-1862.” Journal of Negro History 69, no. 2 (Spring 1984): 63-72.

    I find this article online, and access it through a database. (I used JStor, in this case.) It was published in 1984, so I already know that anything this paper cites came out in 1984 or before 1984. 

    The footnotes (or end notes, in this case, because they came at the end of the paper) tell me where the author got their information:

    image

    This author even annotated their endnotes, telling us more information about the sources they used. If any of those end notes seem relevant to me, I can write them down, and look for them later. 

    But since this was published in 1984, it might also be helpful to see who has mentioned this paper since 1984 for more current information. 

    JStor and Google Scholar (as well as other databases) have helpful buttons like these:

    image

    "2 items citing this item"

    Other items (written works by the author)

    References

    and Related Items.

    Clicking on “2 items citing this item” gives me a list of things published after the article came out in 1984 that cite this. It actually gives me 3 things when I click on the button:

    (via witchsistah)

  3. Text Originally by birdluvr1993

    birdluvr1993:

    masculinity is so funny to me bc men deprive themselves of the best things in life in order to achieve it like ….fuzzy socks, fun fruity pink drinks, spa days, lifetime movies,  expressing positive feelings in a healthy way, being a warm genuine person

    This

    (via blackcappedchickadee)

  4. Quote Originally by natural-lifters Don’t think about what can happen in a month. Don’t think about what can happen in a year. Just focus on the 24 hours in front of you and do what you can to get closer to where you want to be.
    Eric Thomas (via evilseahag)

    I don’t even know where I want to be.

    (via naturalmagics)

    (Source: natural-lifters, via naturalmagics)

  5. Photo Originally by mybeautifulidiot mybeautifulidiot:

one condition, it has to be amazing.

    mybeautifulidiot:

    one condition, it has to be amazing.

    (via 10knotes)

  6. Photo Originally by hotdad71 firestarter2676:

bbwlover420:

jennycraig72:

hotdad71:

Oh yes they do!!

YES THEY DO!

Hell yeah they taste yummy 😆😛😋

We do a whole lot of things better ; )

    firestarter2676:

    bbwlover420:

    jennycraig72:

    hotdad71:

    Oh yes they do!!

    YES THEY DO!

    Hell yeah they taste yummy 😆😛😋

    We do a whole lot of things better ; )

    (via sexysize14plus)

  7. Question Originally by lazypacific Asked by Anonymous
    Anonymous:
    “What are some really cheap places to shop online?”

    breathingxdaisy:

    crazykissing:

    lazypacific:

    if you want free worldwide shipping, you should check out these stores for the best styles:

    I recommend these stores for any of my followers who asked me about shopping, it’s for females only though sorry guys x

    Yas bitch yas.

  8. Originally by ein-bleistift-und-radiergummi

    devilduck:

    'The Jetsons' Candy Packaging, 1960's.

    (Source: pinterest.com)

  9. Photo Originally by the-beauty-of-words-blog
  10. Originally by betype

    betype:

    The Ultimate Design Library Giveaway.

    Monday! The mondays love the typography, so I bring you this giveaway from the Inkydeals site. Inkydeals have released a huge (and monthly) bundle of graphic design resources where you can find tons of different photoshop and illustrator templates, actions, fonts, textures and every bit of resources that you think you will need is probably on this bundle. Is a huge amount of files (38GB) of new graphics never released and different from previous bundles.

    You can take this bundle worth more than $5k for $59 only for 3 days or take the $99 which include this bundle and the previous Epic Bundle.

    Or you can reblog this image and I will choose from the notes 2 winners at the end of the week to give them the complete bundle.

    Just reblog, you don’t even have to follow me. A reblog is a entry to win this super bundle.

    See all the resources here: http://bit.ly/designlibrary

  11. Photo Originally by urkawaiibitch-deactivated201406
  12. Quote Originally by 324b21-clone Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany has been treated like the second coming of Meryl… as she walked on to the Comic-Con stage Saturday night, an enthusiastic fan’s cry of “You deserve an Emmy!” caused the crowd to roar in approval.
    Tatiana Maslany: the subject of more than a few stories declaring her the people’s lead actress (vulture)
  13. Link Originally by 324b21-clone

    10 Things We Learned About Orphan Black at Comic-Con

    324b21-clone:

    1. Not even Tatiana Maslany is sure how to feel about Helena.

    2. Dylan Bruce is relieved that Paul isn’t “a total douchebag.”

    3. Mrs. S’s house is everyone’s favorite set.

    4. Alison and Donnie had a dance party during the garage scene.

    5. Jordan Gavaris is learning taekwondo.

    6. The clone…

  14. Originally by youremyfavoritehigh

    youremyfavoritehigh:

    "What has been the wildest fan experience you’ve had so far?" (x)

  15. Text

    Chaos

    I miss my wife…

PortraitTuesday is the new Sunday and I am the Reverend. Thank you for your sacrificial cheese.
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